Hotel design is changing: The trend is toward lobbies and rooms with a point of view, skewed more toward “living room” than lobby or generic room.

This photo shows the lobby in The Hoxton Hotel in Portland, Ore. London/L.A.-based Fettle designed Portland’s Hoxton. Alongside newly-built rooms, public areas were situated in an old converted movie theater. Tailored but comfy mohair and leather seating and warm wood side tables blend with distressed rugs and displays of ceramics, plants and books. Refurbished timber and concrete beams frame the spaces. And there’s a great story about the reception area’s wood paneling. “We used a lot of local suppliers and material for this project,” Parker says. “The area around Portland is a big producer of Maraschino cherries; the visible face of the wall is made from the outside of reclaimed cherry vats. If you look closely you can even see the imprints where the metal belts that hold the huge vats together were pressed against the wood.” (Ennismore/The Hoxton via AP)
This undated photo provided by 1 Hotel in West Hollywood, Calif., shows an extension of the hotel’s interior space that they are calling the “outddor lobby.” The Hollywood Hills hiking trails next to the hotel were the inspiration; guests can explore a granite pathway that meanders through a ‘canyon’ of native greenery. Log seating and timber planters were created from salvaged Los Angeles-area fallen trees. (RCH Studios/Hunter Kerhart/1 Hotel via AP)
This photo provided by citizenM Hotel shows a stairwell enhanced with graffiti art in their Bowery property in New York. The hotel commissioned the graffiti artists who formerly worked in Queens’ 5 Pointz studios, before a catastrophic fire. Their custom works not only enliven the stairwells, but have created a new Museum of Street Art for guests and neighbors to enjoy. (Christian Johnson/citizenM via AP)
This photo shows the lobby in The Hoxton Hotel in Portland, Ore. London/L.A.-based Fettle designed Portland’s Hoxton. Alongside newly-built rooms, public areas were situated in an old converted movie theater. Tailored but comfy mohair and leather seating and warm wood side tables blend with distressed rugs and displays of ceramics, plants and books. Refurbished timber and concrete beams frame the spaces. And there’s a great story about the reception area’s wood paneling. “We used a lot of local suppliers and material for this project,” Parker says. “The area around Portland is a big producer of Maraschino cherries; the visible face of the wall is made from the outside of reclaimed cherry vats. If you look closely you can even see the imprints where the metal belts that hold the huge vats together were pressed against the wood.” (Ennismore/The Hoxton via AP)
This undated photo provided by 1 Hotel in West Hollywood, Calif., shows an extension of the hotel’s interior space that they are calling the “outddor lobby.” The Hollywood Hills hiking trails next to the hotel were the inspiration; guests can explore a granite pathway that meanders through a ‘canyon’ of native greenery. Log seating and timber planters were created from salvaged Los Angeles-area fallen trees. (RCH Studios/Hunter Kerhart/1 Hotel via AP)

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